2015 ASAA International Aerospace Art Exhibition

May 11- August 28, 2015

at the
2015 forum

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To view the Award Winners, Click Here


Robert Aikins “Model Builder” 18” x 24” Oil

Robert Aikins
“Model Builder”
18” x 24” Oil

Robert Aikins
“Model Builder”

18” x 24” Oil

Model airplane building in the 1950’s was a very popular hobby. Growing up in our nation’s capital, I was fortunate to be able to compete in model building contests sponsored by the Junior Chamber of Commerce.
Pictured in this painting, I am being awarded a First Place and Best of Show trophies in 1954 at the age of 11 with my model of a B-25. In the painting is also featured a balsa wood model of the Stearman PT-17 which was constructed for my grandson’s bedroom. Fun, once again, to smell the paint and glue!


Jerry Anderson  “Thunder Over San Carlos”  24” x 36” Oil

Jerry Anderson
“Thunder Over San Carlos”
24” x 36” Oil

Jerry Anderson
“Thunder Over San Carlos”
24” x 36” Oil
A-4 Skyhawks of the Argentine Navy attack ships of the British Royal Navy during the Falklands War in 1982.

 

 


Gerald Asher “Soviet Suitcases” 12” x 24” Oil

Gerald Asher
“Soviet Suitcases”
12” x 24” Oil

Gerald Asher
“Soviet Suitcases”
12” x 24” Oil

A brace of Sukhoi SU-24 Fencer fighter-bombers cruise at high altitude on an early morning training sortie. Designed as a long range, low-level strike and interdiction aircraft, the SU-24 was affectionately nicknamed “Suitcase” by her flight crews for her ability to carry just about anything.


Jim Balletto “Tweeking The Predator” 16” x 23” Mixed

Jim Balletto
“Tweeking The Predator”
16” x 23” Mixed

Jim Balletto
“Tweeking The Predator”

16” x 23” Mixed
A light-hearted look at the Military UAV Program: shown is a Predator UAV crew attempting to finalize mechanical and electronic systems before a mission. This includes “interference”.

 


Ben Bensen “Thawing Out” 24” x 36” Oil

Ben Bensen
“Thawing Out”
24” x 36” Oil

Ben Bensen
“Thawing Out”
24” x 36” Oil

This painting is a depiction of a C-17 Globemaster II being de-iced on a cold, gray morning at Elmendorf AFB, AK. I was sent to document the changing of the F-15 Eagle to the F-22 Raptor to better protect shipping lanes that were being created by global warming in the North Pole region. On this morning, we witnessed the loading of four aircraft with equipment and goods to be taken to Inuits above Fairbanks in an Air Force Reserve mission


Ardell Bourgeois “242 Scramble” 18” x 32” Oil

Ardell Bourgeois
“242 Scramble”
18” x 32” Oil

Ardell Bourgeois
“242 Scramble”
18” x 32” Oil

242 Squadron, RAF (Canadian), run for their aircraft in the late morning light of a bright September day in 1940. Having fought in France prior to the retreat from the Continent, 242, now led by Sir Douglas Bader, was in the thick of the fighting during the Battle of Britain, probably the most famous aerial engagement in history. In the background is the personal mount of William McKnight, Canada’s fifth highest scoring pilot of the Second World War. He had sixteen kills (seventeen by some sources), two shared and three probables by the time of his death in January, 1941.


Mark Bray “Beyond the Pillars of Hercules” 36” x 24” Oil

Mark Bray
“Beyond the Pillars of Hercules”
36” x 24” Oil

Mark Bray
“Beyond the Pillars of Hercules”
36” x 24” Oil

“That is where you will find Atlantis!” (Plato). Myth, legend or fact, Atlantis reminds us that we are all part of the human race and that we should place great importance on imagination and continued hope. The name Atlantis is ancient Greek for the island of Atlas, where we find the Titan and his bride Pleione striving to stay in contact with their daughters, the seven sisters of the Pleiades. The Space Shuttle Atlantis flew 33 missions, traveling 126 million miles, and has served as the namesake to keep hope and imagination alive.

 


Paul Burrows “Rhinos and Mustangs” 18” x 24” Oil

Paul Burrows
“Rhinos and Mustangs”
18” x 24” Oil

Paul Burrows
“Rhinos and Mustangs”
18” x 24” Oil

Sometime in the ’70s a pair of F4Cs egress the target range at low level. The Phantoms, sometimes called rhinos by their aircrews, are no longer part of the Nevada desert scene, but the mustangs, descendants of horses brought to the area by Spanish explorers in the 16th century, are still here.


Hank Caruso “Towering Resolve” 11” x 14” Mixed

Hank Caruso
“Towering Resolve”
11” x 14” Mixed

Hank Caruso
“Towering Resolve”
11” x 14” Mixed

When Japanese aircraft attacked the US Naval Base at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, one of the “victims” was the 158-foot -tall control tower on Ford Island. (Actually, the tower was only partly completed at the time of the attack.) The historic structure is now being restored by the Pacific Aviation Museum. During the raid, US Army Air Force Lts. George Welch and Kenneth Taylor flew their Curtiss P-40B Warhawks


Hank Caruso “Workin' the Railroad” 14” x 21” Mixed

Hank Caruso
“Workin’ the Railroad”
14” x 21” Mixed

Hank Caruso
“Workin’ the Railroad”
14” x 21” Mixed

The Lockheed P-38 Lightning excelled as an air-to-air and ground attack fighter in both the European and Pacific theaters of combat during World War II. It’s long- range capability and convincing firepower concentrated in its nose made the Lightning a formidable combatant regardless of the mission. In this Aerocature, an Eighth Air Force P-38 brings the war to an Axis locomotive in Europe.


Douglas Castleman “Blue Angel Maintenance” 12” x 24” Oil

Douglas Castleman
“Blue Angel Maintenance”
12” x 24” Oil

Douglas Castleman
“Blue Angel Maintenance”
12” x 24” Oil

A Blue Angels’ F/A-18C Hornet at Los Angeles Airport, as seen from the public viewing area along Imperial Highway, on an exceptionally clear day, right after a rain shower at around 5 pm in the autumn.


John Clark “Above Neptune” 16” x 20” Oil

John Clark
“Above Neptune”
16” x 20” Oil

John Clark
“Above Neptune

16” x 20” Oil

Several of the planet Neptune’s 14 known moons orbit above its atmosphere. Absorption of red light by atmospheric methane is part of what gives Neptune its blue hue.

 


John Clark “Dawn of the Space Age” 16” x 20” Oil

John Clark
“Dawn of the Space Age”
16” x 20” Oil

John Clark
“Dawn of the Space Age”
16” x 20” Oil

Sputnik-1 was the first artificial Earth satellite. It was a 58cm (23 in) diameter polished metal sphere, with four external radio antennas to broadcast radio signals. The Soviet Union launched it into an elliptical low Earth orbit on 4 October 1957.

 


Walter Costilow “Showtime” 11” x 15” Watercolor

Walter Costilow
“Showtime”
11” x 15” Watercolor

Walter Costilow
“Showtime”
11” x 15” Watercolor

A yellow Navy SNJ (Army Air Force T-6) Texan is shown on static display at an air show. More than 15,000 Texans trained aviators in dozens of countries for several decades.

 


Steven Cox “Shine On” 17” x 23” Acrylic

Steven Cox
“Shine On”
17” x 23” Acrylic

Steven Cox
“Shine On”
17” x 23” Acrylic

I saw this beautiful Ryan PT-22 Recruit at the Diamond Point fly-in near Sequim, Washington. Detail studies of PT-22s are a bit cliché, but this was a very challenging and rewarding project. I can still hear the “ poppity, poppity, poppity” sound of that little Kinner radial.

 

 

 


Steven Cox “Sharks” 24” x 30” Acrylic

Steven Cox
“Sharks”
24” x 30” Acrylic


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Steven Cox
“Sharks”

In the early 1950s, two P-51Ds of the Dominican Republic’s Esquadron Ramfis take off for the bomb range, followed by two F-47Ds of Esquadron Leonidas. Despite the association with the awful dictator Rafael Trujillo, I couldn’t resist those googly eyed shark mouths, and the chance to show Mustangs and Jugs together in postwar operations is rare. Aircraft 1916 is now restored and operated by Paul Allen’s Flight Heritage Collection as Upupa Epops, a WWII combat veteran with several aerial victories. The Dominican mustangs were the world’s last to fly operational missions, being retired in 1984. 

 

 


William Dodge “Gulfstream G550” 24” x 36” Oil

William Dodge
“Gulfstream G550”
24” x 36” Oil

William Dodge
“Gulfstream G550”
24” x 36” Oil

A Gulfstream G550 climbs to cruising altitude through late afternoon clouds.

 

 

 

 


 

Gary Elshoff “Lights Afloat” 38” x 19” Stained Glass

Gary Elshoff
“Lights Afloat”
38” x 19” Stained Glass

Gary Elshoff
“Lights Afloat”
38” x 19” Stained Glass

The soft glow of the Aurora Borealis settles gently on the Cessna float plane sitting on an Alaskan inlet during a spectacular display of the Northern Lights.
The work is executed in three layers of colored glass, a technique called “plating.” The front layer of glass is backed up in the area representing the water with a second layer of the sky glass, and a third layer of royal blue glass behind it to give a muted tone to the “reflection” of the lights in the water.

 


Keith Ferris “Beech-18” 24” x 32” Oil

Keith Ferris
“Beech-18”
24” x 32” Oil

Keith Ferris
“Beech-18”
24” x 32” Oil

This is a loving portrait of an aircraft which began life in 1937 as a successful corporate business aircraft. During and after World War II, over 4,500 Beech 18s saw military service as Army Air Force C-45 light transports, AT-7 navigation trainers, AT-11 bombardier trainers and Navy JRB light transports. “Twin Beech” production spanned over 32 years, a world record at that time, with over 9,000 airframes produced. The Beech 18 shown is a surplus C-45, flown by the Sinclair Oil Company for a number of years after WWII.

 


Mark Henn “Ball Turret Gunner” 9” x 12” Sculpture

Mark Henn
“Ball Turret Gunner”
9” x 12” Sculpture

Mark Henn
“Ball Turret Gunner”
9” x 12” Sculpture

One of the most precarious gun positions on a World War II aircraft, the ball turret gunner protected the vulnerable underbelly of both B-17 and B-24 aircraft. After take offs and before landings the gunner would enter or exit the turret.

 


Larry Manofsky “Capt. Colleen Nevius - The first woman aviator to graduate from United States Naval Test Pilot School” 48” x 24” Mixed

Larry Manofsky
“Capt. Colleen Nevius – The first woman aviator to graduate from United States Naval Test Pilot School”
48” x 24” Mixed

Larry Manofsky
“Capt. Colleen Nevius –
The first woman aviator to graduate from
United States Naval Test Pilot School”

48” x 24” Mixed

Colleen Nevius graduated from U.S. Naval Test Pilot School at NAS Patuxent River in June 1983 as a member of Class 83. This painting reflects milestones in her career: First female member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, Navy Commendation Medal, National Defense Medal, Meritorious Unit Commendation, and Navy Battle Efficiency. She became one of the first women to deploy aboard a U.S. warship—LHA 4, USS Nassau—as a member of helicopter detachment Combat HC 6 Support.

 


Priscilla Messner- Patterson “Serenity” 16” x 20” Oil

Priscilla Messner- Patterson
“Serenity”
16” x 20” Oil

Priscilla Messner- Patterson
“Serenity”
16” x 20” Oil

Under a soft winter sky, a Cessna 206 and de Havilland Beaver rest in the calm waters of Kodiak, Alaska’s Trident Basin.

 

 

 


 Wade Meyers “Never Turned Back” 25” x 50” Oil


Wade Meyers
“Never Turned Back”
25” x 50” Oil

Wade Meyers
“Never Turned Back”
25” x 50” Oil

“Mission Maid” was a veteran B-17G with the 457th Bomb Group, based at Glatton. Ship 021 arrived in the UK in December 1943, and on New Year’s Day 1945 completed her 75th mission. She was one of the few camouflaged ‘Forts to remain with the group into 1945. Credited with eight German fighters destroyed, this veteran finished her tour of duty with the Air-Sea Rescue service. Returning to the USA in late 1945, she fell to the scrapper’s torch at Kingman, Arizona.

 


Wade Meyers "Self Potrait Over Georgia” 7” x 11” Oil

Wade Meyers
“Self Potrait Over Georgia”
7” x 11” Oil

Wade Meyers
“Self Portrait Over Georgia”
7” x 11” Oil

Self-portrait of the artist during a flight with the 435th Fighter Training Squadron, based at the time at Moody AFB, Georgia.

 

 


Crissie Murphy “Boneyard Blue” 24” x 24” Acrylic

Crissie Murphy
“Boneyard Blue”
24” x 24” Acrylic

Crissie Murphy
“Boneyard Blue”
24” x 24” Acrylic

A Grumman Albatross rests in the sun while awaiting restoration in Chino, California.

 

 

 

 


Darby Perrin “481st Huns in the Sun” 24” x 36” Oil

Darby Perrin
“481st Huns in the Sun”
24” x 36” Oil

Darby Perrin
“481st Huns in the Sun”
24” x 36” Oil

The 481st Tactical Fighter Squadron arrived at Tan Son Nhut Airbase on 21 June 1965 with eighteen airplanes and began flying combat missions on that first day in South Vietnam. The squadron st averaged over 30 sorties a day and by 6 September 1965, the 481 hours of combat flying. During the six month combat tour, the “Crusaders” F-100s received many hits but only six airplanes were shot down. Both of the aircraft shown here were lost, but both pilots ejected safely.

 


Darby Perrin “American Triple 7” 30” x 48” Oil

Darby Perrin
“American Triple 7”
30” x 48” Oil

Darby Perrin
“American Triple 7”
30” x 48” Oil

The Boeing 777 is a long-range, wide-body, twin-engine jet airliner developed and manufactured by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. It is the world’s largest twinjet and has a typical seating capacity for 314 to 451 passengers, with a range of 5,235 to 9,380 nautical miles. Commonly referred to as the “Triple Seven”, its distinguishing features include the largest-diameter turbofan engines of any aircraft, six wheels on each main landing gear, a circular fuselage cross-section, and a blade-shaped tail cone. American Airlines currently owns 67 of these aircraft.


Darby Perrin “Knife Edge” 48” x 18” Oil

Darby Perrin
“Knife Edge”
48” x 18” Oil

Darby Perrin
“Knife Edge”
48” x 18” Oil

The Hawker Beechcraft T-6A Texan II is a single-engine turboprop aircraft used by the USAF for basic pilot training and by the United States Navy for Primary and Intermediate Joint Naval Flight Officer and Air Force Navigator/Weapons System Operator training. It has replaced the Air Force’s venerable T-37B Tweet and the Navy’s T- 34C Turbo Mentor. The aircraft portrayed here carries markings from the 71st Flying Training Wing at Vance Air Force Base near Enid, Oklahoma.

 

 


Mark Pestana “Laura's Preflight” 24” x 36” Acrylic

Mark Pestana
“Laura’s Preflight”
24” x 36” Acrylic

Mark Pestana
“Laura’s Preflight”
24” x 36” Acrylic

As the sun burns away the dawn fog at Laredo Air Force Base, Texas, 2Lt. Laura Kurtz performs a preflight inspection on a Beech T-1 Jayhawk. Upon graduation from USAF pilot training, Lt. Kurtz was selected to pilot AC-130U Spectre gunships


Cher Pruys “Miss Mitchell” 9” x 12” Mixed

Cher Pruys
“Miss Mitchell”
9” x 12” Mixed

Cher Pruys
“Miss Mitchell”
9” x 12” Mixed

This powerful North American B-25J Mitchell was named after a pioneer of U.S. Military Aviation, Billy Mitchell. It was an American twin- engine medium bomber manufactured by North American Aviation. Many Allied air forces used this plane in every theater of World War II. Nearly 10,000 B-25s in numerous models were built by the end of its production


Cher Pruys “Miss Virginia” 9” x 14” Mixed

Cher Pruys
“Miss Virginia”
9” x 14” Mixed

Cher Pruys
“Miss Virginia”
9” x 14” Mixed

The DC-3 popularized air travel in the United States. Transcontinental flights saw shortened times with fewer refueling stops. Production of civil DC-3s ended in 1942. Military versions saw production until the end of World War II in 1945. General Patton credited this aircraft with being a major contributor to the victory of World War II. Miss Virginia was named to honor both the military and the state of Virginia. Miss Virginia was the name of the P-38 that shot down Japanese Admiral Yamamoto in 1943.


 Cher Pruys “Oshkosh Ready” 13” x 20” Mixed


Cher Pruys
“Oshkosh Ready”
13” x 20” Mixed

Cher Pruys
“Oshkosh Ready”
13” x 20” Mixed

This beautiful Beech 18 is ready to make its appearance at the big air show!

 

 

 


Sharon Rajnus "Out of the Fog" 15” x 27” Watercolor

Sharon Rajnus
“Out of the Fog”
15” x 27” Watercolor

Sharon Rajnus
“Out of the Fog”
15” x 27” Watercolor

Used exclusively in the Atlantic to patrol over the Panama Canal, these PBM-3S Mariners were painted in over-all white with upper surface of gull gray. Wingspan: 118 feet, weight empty: 58,000 lbs. This painting uses an overall “white” theme to represent the aircraft in the fog present at the time.


David Rawlins “Flying Fish Cart” 117” x 72” Mixed

David Rawlins
“Flying Fish Cart”
117” x 72” Mixed

David Rawlins
“Flying Fish Cart”
117” x 72” Mixed

On December 28, 1952, South African Air Force C-47 Dakota 6832, departed Durban on a 1,500 mile flight to the Comoros Islands to retrieve a dead fish. The fish was a
Coelacanth (SEE-lah-kanth), a prehistoric fish that was thought to have gone extinct 70 million years ago. The Comoros Coelacanth was only the second one ever discovered. The first had been caught in East London, South Africa in 1938. Dakota 6832 served with the SAAF for another 40 years before being retired in 1992. Today, 6832 is at the SAAF Museum in Ysterplaat. She has been restored to her 1952 colors and is known as “The Flying Fish Cart”.


David Rawlins “Road Trip to Peru” 24” x 48” Mixed

David Rawlins
“Road Trip to Peru”
24” x 48” Mixed

David Rawlins
“Road Trip to Peru”
24” x 48” Mixed

In late 2013, I made a trip with my friend Fred Gunther to research the B-58 Hustler. Our destination was Grissom Air Force Base, just outside of Peru, Indiana. Back in the early 1960s, it was known as Bunker Hill Air Force Base and Fred was stationed here. His job was maintaining the electronics of the B-58s that were based at there. On a cold windy day in late October, Fred and I spent 3 hours crawling under and over one of the few remaining B-58s in the world, taking many measurements and hundreds of photos while a KC-135 performed touch-and-goes in the background.


Paul Rendel “Check Your Nine Low” 20” x 30” Oil

Paul Rendel
“Check Your Nine Low”
20” x 30” Oil

Paul Rendel
“Check Your Nine Low”
20” x 30” Oil

A B-17 Flying Fortress straggler heads for home, struggling to hold altitude. Two Angels, P-51 Mustangs, appear from Heaven, providing two views of a desperate moment in time in World War II.

 


Norm Siegel “Bennie” 20” x 24” Oil

Norm Siegel
“Bennie”
20” x 24” Oil

Norm Siegel
“Bennie”
20” x 24” Oil

General Bernard Adolph Schriever the man known as the “Father of Air Force Missiles and Space” started his military career in the army field artillery, then transferred to the Air Corps. He won his wings at Kelly Field in 1933 flying Keystone B-4 bombers. In World War II, he flew 33 missions as a B-17 pilot. In 1954 “Bennie” commanded a group of USAF officers responsible for creating the Air Force intercontinental ballistic missile program. At 6’4” Cadet Schriever was obviously too big for his A-1 flight jacket.


Norm Siegel “Homage to Chesley” 28” x 22” Oil

Norm Siegel
“Homage to Chesley”
28” x 22” Oil

Norm Siegel
“Homage to Chesley”
28” x 22” Oil

I’m pretty sure that I wasn’t the only kid inspired by Chesley Bonestell to become an Aerospace artist. His iconic paintings that appeared in Life magazine, Collier’s, and many books depicting man’s conquest of space not only put us there, it implanted the vision that all of this was possible. Not only was he an artist and architect, he was a brilliant and realistic Hollywood matte painter, whose work you won’t notice in movies like “Citizen Kane.”

 


 Russell Smith “Brandeburg Concerto” 25” x 54” Oil


Russell Smith
“Brandeburg Concerto”
25” x 54” Oil

Russell Smith
“Brandeburg Concerto”
25” x 54” Oil

Oberleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen taxis his Hansa Brandenburg W12 into the German seaplane base at Zeebrugge, Belgium.

 


 Russell Smith “Stan's Colorful Steed” 25” x 50” Oil


Russell Smith
“Stan’s Colorful Steed”
25” x 50” Oil

Russell Smith
“Stan’s Colorful Steed”
25” x 50” Oil

“Stan’s Colorful Steed” features SE 5a’s of 40 Sq RAF in May of 1918. The scene depicts the SE 5a’s as they are getting ready to pull the chocks for a sortie. The SE 5a in the foreground is that of Major Stan Dallas, the highest scoring Australian Ace of WWI. Dallas flew this SE 5a, D3511, late in the war. It bore a distinctive camouflage pattern which was not used on other SE 5as.


Mimi Stuart “Rocket Man” 48” x 24” Mixed

Mimi Stuart
“Rocket Man”
48” x 24” Mixed

Mimi Stuart
“Rocket Man”
48” x 24” Mixed

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin once said, “Exploration is wired into our brains. If we see the horizon, we want to know what’s beyond.” In 1903, the Wright brothers stretched that horizon. A mere sixty-six years later, humans viewed the earth from the moon. Our desire to venture out beyond our boundaries, to seek the impossible, to shoot for the stars, continues to push our horizon line ever farther. What once seemed impossible is now within reach.

 


Charles Thompson “Self Portrait, Globe Swift” 30” x 20” Oil

Charles Thompson
“Self Portrait, Globe Swift”
30” x 20” Oil

Charles Thompson
“Self Portrait, Globe Swift”
30” x 20” Oil

This painting captures my reflection in the highly polished aluminium tail fin and rudder of the Globe Swift that I saw on my visit to the Oshkosh air show in 1989.

 

 

 


Richard Wheatland “Chino Shine” 24” x 30” Mixed

Richard Wheatland
“Chino Shine”
24” x 30” Mixed

Richard Wheatland
“Chino Shine”
24” x 30” Mixed

I painted “Chino Shine” following the 2014 ASAA forum visit to the ‘Planes of Fame’ fly-in at Chino California. This highly polished F-86 Sabre caught my eye as it was being prepared for the weekend air show.

 

 


Richard Wheatland “Duxford Cat” 12” x 16” Mixed

Richard Wheatland
“Duxford Cat”
12” x 16” Mixed

Richard Wheatland
“Duxford Cat”
12” x 16” Mixed

I painted “Duxford Cat” from sketches I made and photographs taken while on a visit to Duxford near Cambridge in 2010. The aircraft was being prepared for its pre- season flying display routine practice. This PBY-5A Catalina is a regular on the European display circuit. Since this is a very white aircraft, I have tried to reflect the surrounding color into the white surfaces and added the Fords tow-tractor and team member to assist the composition.